Lonely Planet Hobart Walking Tour

The Lonely Planet guidebook of Tasmania is a great resource for those visiting this beautiful island and it was a fantastic Christmas gift from my parents that really helped us figure out the key sites of Tasmania. The one minor complaint I might direct at the guide is that it’s perhaps a little light on imagery and visual references. Now of course they couldn’t possibly have a photo of everything in the book, otherwise it would be larger than the Encyclopaedia Britannica.

There’s a really nice walking tour on page 59 that I thought could do with some images to help people navigate their way around and get a taste of what they might see on their journey. So that’s what I’d like to do below, add some photos of the various waypoints along the walk. Here’s the walking tour page from the guidebook below.Walking Tour Map

The journey begins at Franklin Square (1) under the watchful eye of the statue of Governor Sir John Franklin.
The journey begins at Franklin Square (1) under the watchful eye of the statue of Governor Sir John Franklin.

Unfortunately the General Post Office (2) is currently undergoing renovation and therefore not the most photogenic of sights. Unless you're really into your scaffolding that is.
Unfortunately the General Post Office (2) is currently undergoing renovation and therefore not the most photogenic of sights. Unless you’re really into your scaffolding that is.

Here's how the GPO should look without scaffolding. Can't wait to see the job they've done on restoring it to its former glory.
Here’s how the GPO should look without scaffolding. Can’t wait to see the job they’ve done on restoring it to its former glory.

Onwards to the Hobart Town Hall (3) which is the seat of the City of Hobart local government area, hosting council meetings as well as acting as public auditorium that can be hired from the council. It is also open to periodic public tours, featuring its ornate Victorian auditorium and the Town Hall organ which has been in use since 1870
Onwards to the Hobart Town Hall (3) which is the seat of the City of Hobart local government area, hosting council meetings as well as acting as public auditorium that can be hired from the council. It is also open to periodic public tours, featuring its ornate Victorian auditorium and the Town Hall organ which has been in use since 1870

The next stop on the tour is the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery (4). I'd highly recommend giving this place an afternoon of your time, there's so much to see and the exhibits are fantastic!
The next stop on the tour is the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery (4). I’d highly recommend giving this place an afternoon of your time, there’s so much to see and the exhibits are fantastic!

From TMAG you move on to Victoria Dock (5) where the local fishermen park up their boats in front of the Henry Jones Art Hotel (6) which is built inside the former IXL jam factory.
From TMAG you move on to Victoria Dock (5) where the local fishermen park up their boats in front of the Henry Jones Art Hotel (6) which is built inside the former IXL jam factory.

Mures (7) is a popular stop for tourists looking to sample the fresh fish caught by the fishermen of Hobart.
Mures (7) is a popular stop for tourists looking to sample the fresh fish caught by the fishermen of Hobart.

Flippers Fish Punt (8) is one of a number of floating barges within Constitution Dock where you can get good value delicious fresh fish.
Flippers Fish Punt (8) is one of a number of floating barges within Constitution Dock where you can get good value delicious fresh fish.

Some lucky punters taking their kayaks for a paddle around Constitution Dock (9) with Roaring 40's Kayaking.
Some lucky punters taking their kayaks for a paddle around Constitution Dock (9) with Roaring 40’s Kayaking.

The next stop on your journey along the waterfront will be Elizabeth Street Pier (10), a classy area with restaurants, bars and accommodation on the upper floor.
The next stop on your journey along the waterfront will be Elizabeth Street Pier (10), a classy area with restaurants, bars and accommodation on the upper floor. Pictured moored at Elizabeth Street Pier is Last Vintage, currently owned by leading Tasmanian winemaker Juan Alcorso who is refurbishing her to be ready to set sail again in 2016. Coming in to berth in the background is Windeward Bound, a charity run vessel that teaches young people skills that would be otherwise beyond their reach.

You'll need to time a trip to Waterman's Dock (11) in conjunction with the tides as it's only accessible when the tide is out. Or you could just get your feet wet :)
You’ll need to time a trip to Waterman’s Dock (11) in conjunction with the tides as it’s only accessible when the tide is out. Or you could just get your feet wet šŸ™‚

The walk starts to venture back inland a little after this when you reach Parliament House (12). It has been the meeting place of the Government of Tasmania since 1841. The building was originally designed as a customs house, and from 1841 until 1904 when the customs offices were relocated, the building served both purposes.
The walk starts to venture back inland a little after this when you reach Parliament House (12). It has been the meeting place of the Government of Tasmania since 1841. The building was originally designed as a customs house, and from 1841 until 1904 when the customs offices were relocated, the building served both purposes.

The next spot on the tour is the serene calmness of St. Davids Park (13), an oasis of peace right in the heart of the city. It was once a graveyard and evidence of that can be seen on the eastern edge where the original gravestones are preserved in a memorial wall.
The next spot on the tour is the serene calmness of St. Davids Park (13), an oasis of peace right in the heart of the city. It was once a graveyard and evidence of that can be seen on the eastern edge where the original gravestones are preserved in a memorial wall.

From St. David's Park you make your way towards Battery Point and will come across the Narryna Heritage Museum (14) on the way, a quaint museum showcasing Tasmania's colonial history.
From St. David’s Park you make your way towards Battery Point and will come across the Narryna Heritage Museum (14) on the way, a quaint museum showcasing Tasmania’s colonial history.

You'll now be in what is my favourite part of Hobart, Battery Point (15). The area is steeped in history and has some of the prettiest houses and cottages you'll ever see. If all the walking has become too much then you should definitely pop into Jackman & McRoss (16) who offer a delicious range of cakes and savoury meals.
You’ll now be in what is my favourite part of Hobart, Battery Point (15). The area is steeped in history and has some of the prettiest houses and cottages you’ll ever see. If all the walking has become too much then you should definitely pop into Jackman & McRoss (16) who offer a delicious range of cakes and savoury meals.

Once you've recharged your batteries you continue your walk into Arthur Circus (17) which alas doesn't contain any exotic animals or high-wire stunts but is indeed a Georgian cottage enthusiasts delight.
Once you’ve recharged your batteries you continue your walk into Arthur Circus (17) which alas doesn’t contain any exotic animals or high-wire stunts but is indeed a Georgian cottage enthusiasts delight.

The charm of Battery Point continues down South Street (18) which is lined with even more historical houses.
The charm of Battery Point continues down South Street (18) which is lined with even more historical houses.

Turning right at the end of McGregor Street will bring you towards Kelly's Steps (19) which were built in 1839 and have no doubt been climbed by a great deal of characters since.
Turning right at the end of McGregor Street will bring you towards Kelly’s Steps (19) which were built in 1839 and have no doubt been climbed by a great deal of characters since.

Kelly's Steps will bring you down into Salamanca Place (21), a host of redeveloped warehouses that are now the home of high end bars and restaurants and artists studios.
Kelly’s Steps will bring you down into Salamanca Place (20), a host of redeveloped warehouses that are now the home of high end bars and restaurants and artists studios.

After walking around some of Hobart's best sites all day, you'll no doubt be thirsty and in need of refreshment. There's quite a few bars and restaurants in Salamanca and Knopwood's Retreat (21)is a great option.
After walking around some of Hobart’s best sites all day, you’ll no doubt be thirsty and in need of refreshment. There’s quite a few bars and restaurants in Salamanca and Knopwood’s Retreat (21) is a great option.
That brings us to the end of Lonely Planet’s suggested walking tour of Hobart. It’s a veritable who’s who of the cities key sites but is by no means exhaustive as there’s so much more to see in and around Hobart. Walking is the best way to see the city and pretty much every major attraction is within walking distance. I hope these images help add a little visual reference to go with the Lonely Planet guidebook and I highly recommend trying out this walking tour for yourself and exploring beyond its confines to discover your own little slice of Hobart.


8 thoughts on “Lonely Planet Hobart Walking Tour

  1. Guess you’ve made your point, James. So much better with a few well-taken shots. I particularly like the maritime photos. Good luck.

    1. Hi Cathy, thanks very much for the kind words. These were all taken on my trusty Fujifilm X30 which I talk about in the “My photo gear” section of the blog. The lens on it is a 28-112 F2-2.8 equivalent. Amazing camera and I use it to take 90%+ of the shots on this blog.

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